RSS Feed http://etcada.com This is an RSS Feed en Fri, 14 Dec 2018 22:42:37 +0000 Fri, 14 Dec 2018 22:42:37 +0000 5 http://etcada.com/blog/post/alcohol-is-killing-more-people-and-younger-the-heaviest-increases-are-among-women Alcohol is killing more people, and younger. The heaviest increases are among women. http://etcada.com/blog/post/alcohol-is-killing-more-people-and-younger-the-heaviest-increases-are-among-women <p style="line-height:25.5pt;background:#FAFAFA"><strong>Alcohol is killing more people, and younger. The heaviest increases are among women</strong></p><p><strong><a href="http://www.usatoday.com/staff/870/jayne-odonnell/">Jayne O'Donnell</a>, USA TODAY</strong>Published 11:01 a.m. ET Nov. 16, 2018 | <strong>Updated 11:09 a.m. ET Nov. 16, 2018</strong></p><p><img alt="Image title" class="fr-image-dropped fr-fin fr-dib" src="/uploads/blog/036fec2812ddabb15f8766134d958dab1a78a71f.png" width="742"><br></p><!--[if !vml]--><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom: 11.25pt;margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">OAKTON, Va. – The last time lawyer Erika Byrd talked her way out of an alcohol rehab center, her father took her to lunch.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom: 11.25pt;margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">"Dad, I know what alcohol has done to me," she told him that day in January 2011. "I know what it has made me do to you and mom. But that wasn’t me." </p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">By the time she died three months later, Byrd had blocked her parents' calls because they kept having her involuntarily committed. They once had a magistrate judge hold a hearing at her hospital bed. He ordered herto undergo a month of in-patient treatment. </p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">Byrd, who died in April 2011 at the age of 42, is among the rising number of people in the United States who have been killed by alcohol in the last decade.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">It's an increase that has been obscured by the opioid epidemic. But alcohol kills more people each year than overdoses – <a href="https://vizhub.healthdata.org/gbd-compare/">through cancer, liver cirrhosis, pancreatitis and suicide, among other ways</a>.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">From 2007 to 2017, the number of deaths attributable to alcohol increased 35 percent, according to a new analysis by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington. The death rate rose 24 percent.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">One alarming statistic: Deaths among women rose 67 percent. Women once drank far less than men, and their more moderate drinking helped prevent heart disease, offsetting some of the harm.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">Deaths among men rose 29 percent.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">While teen deaths from drinking were down about 16 percent during the same period, deaths among people aged 45 to 64 rose by about a quarter.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">People's risk of dying, of course, increases as they age. What's new is that alcohol is increasingly the cause.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">"The story is that no one has noticed this," says Max Griswold, who helped develop the alcohol estimates for the institute."It hasn't really been researched before."</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">The District of Columbia, less than 10 miles away from the Venable law office where Byrd was a partner, hadthe highest rate of death from alcohol in the country, according to the institute's analysis. Georgia and Alabama came in second and third. </p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">Alabama, in fact, ranked third amongstates with the strongest alcohol control policies, as rated by<a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24355666"> medical researchers in a 2014 report </a>published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">States can influence drinking – especially dangerous binge drinking – with policies such as taxes on alcohol and restrictions on where and whenit can be sold.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">Psychologist Benjamin Miller, chief strategy officer at the nonprofit Well Being Trust, says the larger health challenges in the South are to blame for high alcohol death rates. Southern states typically rank near the bottom in national rankings in cancer, cardiovascular disease and overall health.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">Oklahoma, Utah, Kansas and Tennessee rounded out the five states with the strongest alcohol control policies, the researchers reported. States with more stringent alcohol control policies had lower rates of binge drinking, they found.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">Nevada, South Dakota, Iowa, Wyoming and Wisconsin had the weakest alcohol control policies.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">David Jernigan, a professor at Boston University's school of public health who has specialized in alcohol research for 30 years, notes that the beer industry holds considerable sway in Wisconsin.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">Binge drinking is sending far more people to the emergency room, a separate team of researchers reported in the February 2018 issue of the journal Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">The researchers, who looked at ER visits from 2006 to 2014,found the largest increases were among the middle aged – especially women.The number of teenage binge drinkers landing in the ER during that time actually declined.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">Older, often lifelong drinkers don't need only to have their stomachs pumped. They frequently have multiple complications from their drinking.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">Their often bulbous bellies need to be drained of fluid, which builds up from liver cirrhosis, and their lungs cleared of aspirated vomit, says Dr. Anthony Marchetti, an emergency room doctor at Upson Regional Medical Center in Thomaston, Georgia.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">They might also have brain hemorrhages or internal bleeding, because booze prevents their blood from clotting properly.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">By middle age, Marchetti says, long-term drinking can also lead to heart failure, infections due to immune suppression, a type of dementia from alcohol-induced brain damage, stomach ulcers, and a much higher risk of cancer.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">As opioid overdoses, which kill about 72,000 people a year, grabbed America's attention, the slower moving epidemic of alcohol accelerated, especially in Southern states and the nation's capital. <a href="https://www.niaaa.nih.gov/alcohol-health/overview-alcohol-consumption/alcohol-facts-and-statistics">About 88,000 people die each year from alcohol</a>. </p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">Making matters worse, alcoholism is trickier to treat – and criticize – than opioid addiction. </p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">"Culturally, we’ve made it acceptable to drink, but not to go out and shoot up heroin," Millersays. "A lot of people will read this and say 'What's the problem?'"</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">It might be a more socially acceptable addiction, but alcoholism is at least three times costlier to treat than opioid addiction, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And it's a far more complicated midlife crisis to address.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">The proven approaches – taxes on alcohol and limits on where and when alcohol is sold – are often rejected because the liquor industry has considerable clout with policymakers.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">Ron Byrd says his daughter Erika was"beautiful inside and out."</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">To him, there's no question about what causer her death. </p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">That's despite the fact there was no alcohol in her system when she was found dead at home. She was so sick, Byrd says<strong>, </strong>she hadn't be able to eat or drink for days.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">"The death certificate never says alcoholism," hesays. "It said heart arrhythmia and heart valve disease. But nobody in our family had heart problems."</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA"><a href="http://www.lisasmithauthor.com/">Attorney Lisa Smith</a> has been in recovery from alcohol and cocaine addiction for a decade. The New York City woman wrote the memoir "Girl Walks Out of a Bar" and co-hosts the podcast Recovery Rocks.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">Smithspeaks at legal conferences and law firms such as Byrd's about the hazards of lawyers' high-stress days and booze-fueled dinners with clients. But she's fighting forces far larger than her profession. </p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">"It is poison, and we’re treating it like it's something other than that because there‘s big corporate money behind it," she says. "A lot of people are getting really rich on something that is toxic to us."</p><h2 style="margin-top:15.0pt;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:15.0pt;margin-left: 45.0pt;background:#FAFAFA">Deaths of despair</h2><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">In its <a href="http://www.paininthenation.org/assets/pdfs/TFAH-2017-PainNationRpt.pdf">Pain in the Nation</a> report this year, the Well Being Trust called losses from drugs, alcohol and suicide "despair deaths."</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">The three are closely related. Suicide is the third leading cause of death from alcohol, after cancers anddigestive diseases. One in five individuals who die from opioid overdoses have alcohol in their system at the time of their death.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">Drinking can lead to cancers all along the digestive tract, from the mouth to the colon. About 15 percent of U.S. breast cancer cases are considered to be caused by alcohol. A third of those cases affected women who drank 1.5 drinks or less a week, according to a <a href="https://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/pdf/10.2105/AJPH.2012.301199">2013 report in the American Journal of Public Health</a>.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">The "direct toxicity" of alcohol damages the nervous system from the brain down to the spinal cord and to peripheral nerves, says Marchetti, the Georgia emergency physician. It's common for people in the late stages of alcoholism to have numbness in their feet and legs, which makes walking difficult even when they aren't impaired. </p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">Emergency rooms are the most expensive place to treat problems. Between 2008 and 2014, the rate of ER visits involving acute alcohol consumption rose nearly 40 percent, according to the study in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research. For chronic alcohol use, the rate rose nearly 60 percent.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">The increases for acute and chronic alcohol use were larger for women.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">People who drink throughout their lifetime develop a tolerance for alcohol. But as they age, they lose muscle and gain fat, and become less tolerant.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">That leads to increased injuries and illnesses, says Rick Grucza, an associate professor of psychiatry at Washington University in St. Louis and lead author of the Alcoholism study.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">But why are so many people drowning so many sorrows?</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">Brenda Padgett believes it was postpartum depression that led her daughter to take up the heavy drinking that ultimately killed her last year.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">Ashley Hartshorn, who lived in Hendersonville, North Carolina, had already suffered the trauma of hearingher <a href="https://cowtowncrime.com/2018/02/26/deadly-affection-the-suzanne-parsons-story/Deadly%20Affection:%20The%20Suzanne%20Parson's%20story">stepfather kill his girlfriend</a> while she was on the phone.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">Then Hartshorn testified against him in court, which helped send him to prison for life.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">The depression came after the birth of her third child in February 2012. </p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">"She wanted so badly to quit drinking, but the shame and the fear kept her from being able to allow herself to reach out for help," Padgett says. "Like many, we were ignorant to the effects that alcohol has on the body. I thought she had time, time to hit rock bottom and time to seek help.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">"I never knew that only five years of alcohol abuse could take the life of someone so young."</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">Neither did Nancy Juracka. Her son Lance died in 2006 after just three years of heavy drinking. He was 36.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">Lance Juracka, who grew up in Hermosa Beach, California, was intimately familiar with the scourge of alcoholism: He knew an uncle and aunt had drunk themselves to death before he was born. He even produced a short documentary about alcohol abuse while at New York University's Tisch School of the Arts. </p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">He started drinking when he got a job in Las Vegas reviewing shows – and was continually offered free drinks. </p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">"Once he got a taste for alcohol, it really did him in fast," his mother says. "I don’t understand how Lance’s liver went so quick."</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">He headed back to California, and ultimately moved back in with his mother.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">He started a painting business. But his workers told Juracka he would just drink vodka or sleep. </p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">"I thought I was going to lose my mind, I was so frantic," she says. "I would sit up all night with him so he wouldn’t choke on this vomit."</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">Joseph Garbely, an internal and addiction medicine physician at Caron Treatment Centers in Wernersville, Pennsylvania, says research shows that 10 percent of parents think having two or more alcoholic drinks a day is reasonable to reduce their stress.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">But why? It's not as if liquor is becoming more accepted.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">Consider, however, the lack of public service announcements about the effect excessive alcohol has on health or families.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">Ali Mokdad is a professor at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation. He notes that alcohol-related education focuses on drunk driving. </p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">Miller and others point to the high level of workplace stress that began accelerating during the recession, loneliness linked to social media and increasing pressures on working mothers. </p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">In fact, social isolation canbe both a cause and the result of excessive drinking. Parents whose children drank themselves to death in their 20s and 30s often describe the drinking in isolation seen in elderly alcoholics.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">Few who drink excessively while young will become alcoholics, much less drink themselves to death. Those who are in recovery for alcoholism say people who turn high school or college binge drinking into a nightly coping ritual are at the most risk.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">Amy Durham came close to dying from alcohol six years ago, when she was 40. And she barely drank until she was in her 30s.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">The child of an alcoholic father, Durham never thought she could or would lose control. </p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">"I didn't even know what was happening to me," she says.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">She attributes her plunge into alcoholism to unresolved trauma from growing up in an alcoholic home, the stress of her work as a school principal, a "toxic" romantic relationship and grief over an inability to get pregnant.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">"I just needed to be numb," she says.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">Ron Byrd says Erika, too, dreamed of having children. After two divorces and stage 3b breast cancer, however, the chance was slipping away. </p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">"She wanted so desperately to have a baby," Byrd says.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">Durham is now corporate director of alumni relations at Pennsylvania-based Caron Treatment Centers, where she was treated. </p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">"I wasn’t able to see that my drinking was a problem until it was almost too late," she says."I put limits on myself and would say that i'd only drink two glasses of wine in a social setting and then go home and drink a lot in isolation." </p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">When her father died in July 2012 of esophageal cancer, Durham says, she began a "very bad downward spiral."</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">She remembers his funeral.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">"i was trying to be nothing like my father, but I couldn’t wait to get out of that church and drink," she says. "The shame of what was happening to me was more than I could bear."</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">Like Hartshorn and Byrd, Durham started with white wine. But she ended up drinking copious amounts of vodka.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">By the time her family got her to a hospital, Durham was in triple organ failure and wound up in a coma for 10 days.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">That was followed by six weeks of dialysis.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">When she arrived at in-patient rehab after the dialysis, Durham says, her body and eyes were still yellow and she was carrying 100 extra pounds of fluid – half of it in her legs.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">She says fellow rehab residents – no strangers to the telltale signs of addiction – quickly looked away as she passed.</p><h2 style="margin-top:15.0pt;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:15.0pt;margin-left: 45.0pt;background:#FAFAFA">Men vs. women drinkers</h2><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">When men crash and burn from alcohol, Mokdad says, the spectacle is often public. They get into bar fights, get cited by police for drunk driving, or lose heir jobs.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">A more typical trajectory for women starts with evening wine, as a way to de-stress from the work day – either in a professional setting, or home with young children.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">Author and <a href="https://www.podcastone.com/For-Crying-Out-Loud">podcast co-host</a> Stefanie Wilder-Taylor, the writer of "Sippy Cups Are Not for Chardonnay," believes this stems from stubborn gender roles and norms surrounding stress. </p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">"Moms just aren't going to call home and say they're stopping for a couple drinks after work with friends or going to the gym to unwind," the Los Angeles womansays</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">Otherwise, they might feel like parenting failures as they compare themselves to other moms. So they drink wine while they make dinner, which can lead to a nightly pattern of excessive drinking.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">That describes nurse practitioner Eileen O'Grady, who quit drinking 12 years ago.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">O'Grady, who lives in McLean, Va., says her two sons, now in college, never really saw her drunk. But she couldn't bear the thought of continuing her destructive double life. She would drink continually from dinner until she went to sleep, she says, and then start again the next evening. </p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">For O'Grady, the last straw came after a night of especially hard drinking with another mom in her neighborhood.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">The other woman, a schoolteacher, vomited in O'Grady's car. She returned the next day to clean it up. </p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">O'Grady hasn't taken another drink.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">"I could see my life if I kept going," says O'Grady. She is now active in her local recovery community and working as a wellness coach. </p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">Her schoolteacher friend taught classes until last fall. Within days of leaving the classroom, she was in a hospital with end-stage liver disease.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">She died in hospice on Jan. 3.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">At least 15 people at the woman's memorial service asked O'Grady how her friend had died. They were stunned to learn alcohol was the cause.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">The woman was poisoning herself with a half gallon of vodka a day, O'Grady says, yet no one knew beyond her immediate family, O'Grady and a mutual friend in the neighborhood. </p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">"We're closeted," O'Grady says. "We're not in bars getting in fights."</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">As for Durham, she was on a liver transplant list for about five months in 2011 and 2012. Then she learned she no longer needed a new liver.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">"Livers have a great capacity for recovery," says Dr. Michael Lucey, a professor and head of the division of gastroenterology and hepatology at the University of Wisconsin medical school. </p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">Durham was once in a sorority at University of Mississippi, where beauty was competitive and a popular saying was, "pretty is as pretty does."</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">"But there was nothing pretty about my drinking," she says.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">If she had been diagnosed with breast cancer, Durham says, she wouldn't think twice about getting treatment, and talking about it.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">Durham stopped drinking six years ago Thursday. She says she surprises people with how openly she shares the gritty details of her near-death experience.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">"I want to show the world what recovery looks like, especially for women where stigma is still the way it is," Durham says. "I want people to know there is hope."</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">Erika Byrd called her father in hysterics on April 9, 2011. She had been fired after failing to turn in paperwork to continue getting disability coverage through her law firm.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">"I don’t want to want it, but I want it," Byrd recalls her saying, sobbing. </p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">"I said, 'If you can stop drinking you can do anything,'" says Byrd. "I told her, 'We love you, Erika,' and she hung up."</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">Byrd and his wife were getting ready to go to church the next day when there was a knock on the door. A pastor stood with a police officer. Erika was dead.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">A doctor from the National Institute for Mental Health called to ask if the Byrdswould consider donating Erika's brain for research.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">They said yes.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">"She had done everything she knew how to to beat this terrible disease," Ron Byrd says. "I would think she would want it." </p><p><br></p> Fri, 16 Nov 2018 06:00:00 +0000 http://etcada.com/blog/post/fda-proposes-ban-on-menthol-cigarettes-restricts-sales-of-sweet-e-cigarettes FDA Proposes Ban On Menthol Cigarettes, Restricts Sales Of Sweet E-Cigarettes http://etcada.com/blog/post/fda-proposes-ban-on-menthol-cigarettes-restricts-sales-of-sweet-e-cigarettes <p><b>FDA proposes ban on menthol cigarettes, restricts sales of sweet e-cigarettes</b></p><p><b><a href="http://www.usatoday.com/staff/870/jayne-odonnell/">Jayne O'Donnell</a>, </b><b>USA TODAY</b>Published 10:10 a.m. ET Nov. 15, 2018 | <b>Updated 11:32 a.m. ET Nov. 15, 2018</b></p><p> </p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom: 11.25pt;margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">In sweeping moves intended to <a href="https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2018/08/13/teen-vaping-fda-weighs-ban-flavored-e-cigarette-liquid/890218002/">curb smoking and vaping among youth</a>, the Food and Drug Administration on Thursday tightened tobacco enforcement, announced plans to ban menthol cigarettes and many flavored small cigars, and moved forward with restrictions on sales of sweet-flavored electronic cigarette liquid.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom: 11.25pt;margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA;orphans: 2; text-align:start;widows: 2;-webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;word-spacing:0px">The actions come in response to data released Thursday that show dramatic increases in vaping among young people. <a href="https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2018/09/12/fda-scott-gottlieb-youth-vaping-e-cigarettes-epidemic-enforcement/1266923002/">FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb has called the use of nicotine-delivering e-cigarettes by youth an "epidemic."</a></p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA;orphans: 2;text-align: start;widows: 2;-webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;word-spacing:0px">E-cigarette use was up 78 percent among high school students and 48 percent among middle-school students from 2017 to 2018, according to the 2018 National Youth Tobacco Survey released by the FDA and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA;orphans: 2;text-align: start;widows: 2;-webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;word-spacing:0px"><b><i>The total number of middle and high school students now using e-cigarettes rose to 3.6 million, an increase of 1.5 million students</i></b>.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA;orphans: 2;text-align: start;widows: 2;-webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;word-spacing:0px">"There's absolutely nothing in the data set that you can point to and say, 'that's encouraging,'" Gottlieb told USA TODAY's editorial board on Wednesday. "It's all discouraging." </p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA;orphans: 2;text-align: start;widows: 2;-webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;word-spacing:0px">Gottlieb said vaping products flavored with anything other than tobacco, mint or menthol may now be sold only in stores that can verify the age of all customers who walk in the door.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA;orphans: 2;text-align: start;widows: 2;-webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;word-spacing:0px">Sweet-flavored vape liquids may be sold online only<strong> </strong>when there is more stringent age verification. </p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA;orphans: 2;text-align: start;widows: 2;-webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;word-spacing:0px">Flavors are the focus of the new measures, Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar said, because children choose flavored tobacco and nicotine products more often than adults, and "flavors are a major reason they use these products in the first place."</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA;orphans: 2;text-align: start;widows: 2;-webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;word-spacing:0px">Some flavors are far more attractive than others. When it comes to vaping, mint- and menthol-flavored e-cigarettes are far more popular with adults than with kids.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA;orphans: 2;text-align: start;widows: 2;-webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;word-spacing:0px">One survey cited by FDA showed only 20 percent of e-cigarette users aged 12 to 17 used mint or menthol. More than 40 percent of adult vapers did.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA;orphans: 2;text-align: start;widows: 2;-webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;word-spacing:0px">E-cigarette manufacturers say the vapor-producing devices are intended to help adult smokers quit. They say they are not intended for use by children.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">Juul Labs, the leading e-cigarette manufacturer and the most popular one with youths, got ahead of the FDA's announcement <a href="https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/health/2018/11/13/juul-flavored-e-cigarette-products-social-media-fda-crackdown/1990688002/">when it announced plans on Wednesday </a>to discontinue sales of its mango, fruit, creme and cucumber flavored e-liquid pods at more than 90,000 retail stores.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA;orphans: 2;text-align: start;widows: 2;-webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;word-spacing:0px">The company also said it would require additional age verification measures for online sales of the flavors, </p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA;orphans: 2;text-align: start;widows: 2;-webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;word-spacing:0px">With the new restrictions, Gottlieb said, he was trying to strike a balance between helping adult smokers quit through less-dangerous vaping while reducing the chance more young people will become addicted to nicotine.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA;orphans: 2;text-align: start;widows: 2;-webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;word-spacing:0px">Public health professionals fear that taking up vaping could lead teens to try smoking when their electronic devices aren't available. </p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA;orphans: 2;text-align: start;widows: 2;-webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;word-spacing:0px">If the FDA prohibited mint and menthol vape flavors, Gottlieb said, it could make cancer-causing menthol cigarettes more attractive. That would be especially risky, because many young people are already attracted to menthol. </p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA;orphans: 2;text-align: start;widows: 2;-webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;word-spacing:0px">More than half of children 12 to 17 who start smoking will do so with a menthol cigarette, Gottlieb says.</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA;orphans: 2;text-align: start;widows: 2;-webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;word-spacing:0px">Lyle Beckwith, senior vice president of government relations at the National Association of Convenience Stores, says a ban on menthol cigarettes will "only shift those sales to the black market," which he says already exists. </p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA;orphans: 2;text-align: start;widows: 2;-webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;word-spacing:0px">"Black-market sellers of tobacco products do not check the ages of their purchasers, do not pay taxes on their sales, and sell more than just menthol cigarettes," he says. </p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA;orphans: 2;text-align: start;widows: 2;-webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;word-spacing:0px">Beckwith also said it supports enforcement of age verification for e-cigarettes, but urged FDA to share any information showing its proposal will assure underage children don't have access to the devices. </p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA;orphans: 2;text-align: start;widows: 2;-webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;word-spacing:0px">The FDA will also change its enforcement policy on flavored cigars so any that weren't on the market before February 2007 can no longer be sold until they submit an extensive scientific and safety evaluation that the agency approves. </p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA;orphans: 2;text-align: start;widows: 2;-webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;word-spacing:0px">Robin Koval, CEO of the anti-tobacco advocacy group Truth Initiative, says banning menthol cigarettes and all flavored cigars is "one of the most powerful actions FDA can take when it comes to saving lives," but she urged FDA to act quickly. </p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">"The regulatory process can be slow and each day lost is measured in lives," Koval said. "FDA’s proposed sales restrictions on e-cigarettes are a step forward, but by themselves are not enough to stem the youth e-cigarette epidemic." </p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA;orphans: 2;text-align: start;widows: 2;-webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;word-spacing:0px">Truth Initiative wants the FDA to eliminate flavors, ban online sales, further restrict marketing to youths and conduct thorough scientific reviews of vaping company applications so it's clear e-cigarettes have an overall benefit to public health "before they show up in every high school in America," she says. </p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA;orphans: 2;text-align: start;widows: 2;-webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;word-spacing:0px">"The bottom line," Gottlieb said, "is that these new proposals to address flavors and protect youth would dramatically impact the ability of American kids to access tobacco products that we know are both appealing and addicting." </p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA;orphans: 2;text-align: start;widows: 2;-webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px;text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;word-spacing:0px">He could have banned all flavors, Gottlieb said – and he still might. </p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-right:0in;margin-bottom:11.25pt; margin-left:45.0pt;line-height:16.5pt;background:#FAFAFA">"Make no mistake, if policy changes don’t reverse this epidemic, and if the manufacturers don’t do their part to help in this cause, I’ll explore additional actions," he said.</p> Fri, 16 Nov 2018 06:00:00 +0000 http://etcada.com/blog/post/waskom-etbu-police-train-to-combat-teen-drinking Waskom, ETBU police train to combat teen drinking http://etcada.com/blog/post/waskom-etbu-police-train-to-combat-teen-drinking <!--StartFragment--><!--StartFragment--><p><i>On Tuesday, September 4, East Texas Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse (ETCADA) and the Harrison County Community Coalition organized and hosted a Controlled Party Dispersal Training for local Law Enforcement in Harrison County. ETCADA partnered with the Waskom Police Department, Texans Standing Tall, and the San Antonio Vice Unit who provided the classroom and demonstrative training for the officers in attendance. Officers spent two hours in classroom training and two hours practicing different scenarios of house parties and how they should respond to different situations. The training was beneficial to officers as it applied to their necessary TCOLE hours and allowed officers to gain more knowledge of how to maintain control and follow proper procedures when responding to a party where minors are in possession of and consuming alcohol.</i></p><p><i> </i></p><p><i>Waskom High School partnered with ETCADA by providing leaders from the Student Council to be actors in the hands-on demonstration portion of the training. Students were also able to learn about the possible consequences of what would happen if they were at a party where alcohol was being served to minors. Students learned the best preventative measures to take to avoid being involved in an underage drinking situation. Local businesses also partnered with ETCADA for the training; Cajun Tex, Bodacious, and Jalapeno Tree in Marshall as well as Victor’s Hangout in Waskom all helped by donating lunch for the students and officers.</i></p><p><i> </i></p><p><i>ETCADA will continue to partner with Texans Standing Tall in the coming months to provide the same training in Henderson and Panola County.</i></p><p><br></p><p>Here is the story that ran in the Marshall Messenger on Wednesday September 5, 2018</p><!--StartFragment--><ul style="box-sizing: border-box; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 10px; padding-left: 0px; list-style: none; margin-left: -5px; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: "><li><span data-original-title="" id="author-popup-db998e56-11a5-11e8-ae10-1fa63efad4c3-asset-0b9baa5e-b09c-11e8-b68c-cfbdd2034b42" itemprop="author" rel="popover" title=""><a href="https://www.marshallnewsmessenger.com/users/profile/bortigo">By Bridget Ortigo Bortigo@marshallnewsmessenger.</a></span></li>&nbsp;</ul><!--EndFragment--><p style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 0px 30px; color: rgb(68, 68, 68); font-size: 19px; line-height: 25px; font-family: ">WASKOM — Waskom and East Texas Baptist University police teamed up Tuesday to undergo specialized training with San Antonio Police Department Vice Unit detectives, in order to combat teen drinking.</p><p>The first responders had some help from Waskom High School Student Council juniors and seniors as the students acted out the part of teen drinkers at a high school party while the police carried out a “raid,” at Waskom Fire Station.</p><p>The specialized Controlled Party Dispersal Training was organized by Texans Standing Tall, a state-wide coalition aimed to prevent teen drinking and drug use, along with Harrison County Coalition of the East Texas Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse (ETCADA), retired Texas Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms (TABC) Chief Joel Moreno and was funded by a grant from the Texas Department of Transportation.</p><p>The training started with teaching the officers the proper procedures and techniques to safely control the breakup of parties where underage youth are drinking alcohol. The training also included ways for officers to discourage future underage drinking and educate the community on the dangers of youth alcohol use.</p><p>TST, Moreno and San Antonio PD Vice Unit Detective Michael Castano also explained to the high schoolers and the local police the new Social Host Ordinance that has been adopted by four Texas cities so far, including San Antonio. The ordinance holds responsible, legally, any adults responsible for hosting or contributing to youth drinking.</p><p>Waskom Police Chief Monty Meisenheimer said Tuesday’s training was extremely helpful and he hopes to take a proposal to the Waskom mayor and city council, asking them to adopt the Social Host Ordinance.</p><p>“This training was very applicable and relevant, with school starting back recently, and we are thrilled to have them here,” Meisenheimer said. “I think this creates better understanding on both sides and I think the Social Host Ordinance would be a great thing for Waskom.”</p><p>ETCADA Program Director Harold Womble said the groups hope to take this training to more East Texas cities soon including Carthage and Athens.</p><p>“Controlled Party Dispersal Training is an effective strategy that goes beyond breaking up parties,” TST Strategy Specialist Anne-Shirley Schreiner said. “The training is unique in its interactive, hands-on approach that gives coalitions, organizations, and law enforcement agencies an opportunity to work together to address underage alcohol use and keep young people safe.”</p><p><br></p><!--EndFragment--><!--EndFragment--><p><br></p><p><br></p> Wed, 05 Sep 2018 05:00:00 +0000 http://etcada.com/blog/post/harrison-county-community-coalition-partnership-hosts-burritos-over-booze Harrison County Community Coalition Partnership hosts Burritos over Booze http://etcada.com/blog/post/harrison-county-community-coalition-partnership-hosts-burritos-over-booze <!--StartFragment--><p style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 0px 30px; color: rgb(68, 68, 68); font-size: 19px; line-height: 25px; font-family: ">“There’s more ways to have fun than underage drinking” is the message the Harrison County Community Coalition Partnership is bringing to college students this week, as the anti-drug and alcohol group kicked off its inaugural “Burritos over Booze” campaign at Texas State Technical College-Marshall, Tuesday.</p><p style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 0px 30px; color: rgb(68, 68, 68); font-size: 19px; line-height: 25px; font-family: ">“Our Harrison County coalition came up with this idea on their own,” said Nathaniel Olson, coalition program manager for East Texas Council on Alcoholism &amp; Drug Abuse, also known as ETCADA.</p><p style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 0px 30px; color: rgb(68, 68, 68); font-size: 19px; line-height: 25px; font-family: ">“We’re at TSTC today and then we’re going to be at Wiley College on Sunday,” said Olson, noting they will be serving burritos and dispensing information from 1-2 p.m. “We’re inviting the college students to come out. What we’re trying to do is share the message that there’s other activities that people can be involved in other than drinking that are safer and healthier and (that) binge drinking and underage drinking are not healthy, safe things to do.</p><p style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 0px 30px; color: rgb(68, 68, 68); font-size: 19px; line-height: 25px; font-family: ">“So we’re trying to pass out burritos, have fun, and just show the young people that there are other options out there, other ways to get involved, including in the coalition,” he said. “We just want to pass out free food and just get young people involved in what we’re doing.”</p><p style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 0px 30px; color: rgb(68, 68, 68); font-size: 19px; line-height: 25px; font-family: ">Tuesday’s event proved to be a success as the coalition reached 44 participants with their message. Olson said he was pleased with the turnout, especially since it was a new event.</p><p style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 0px 30px; color: rgb(68, 68, 68); font-size: 19px; line-height: 25px; font-family: ">“We had a whole bunch of kids and faculty attend,” he said. “With the first event we weren’t really sure how many to expect, and with it being summertime we knew not a lot of kids were on campus, and so we were really pleased with how many came out today.”</p><p style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 0px 30px; color: rgb(68, 68, 68); font-size: 19px; line-height: 25px; font-family: ">In addition to their targeted message about the health dangers of underage and binge drinking, the coalition distributed literature on marijuana, prescription drug abuse and synthetic marijuana. Annette Ellis, TSTC director of student services, said her department was glad to partner up with the coalition and also provide some educational material on drinking and driving laws and online counseling services.</p><p style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 0px 30px; color: rgb(68, 68, 68); font-size: 19px; line-height: 25px; font-family: ">“We provided some educational material and wanted a fun activity because the students are at the end of the semester, completing their finals; and graduation is on Friday,” said Ellis. “With that in mind, we wanted to provide a light snack and have a fun event and kind of release some of the stress while they are moving around the campus while they are taking the final.”</p><p style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 0px 30px; color: rgb(68, 68, 68); font-size: 19px; line-height: 25px; font-family: ">As an activity, each participant was afforded the chance to don a pair of alcohol impairment simulation goggles, and try to walk a straight line. Once they made it to the end, they were challenged to try to stack a set of plastic cups on top of each other.</p><p style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 0px 30px; color: rgb(68, 68, 68); font-size: 19px; line-height: 25px; font-family: ">Student Christina Sims said she enjoyed learning about the dangers of underage and binge drinking through the innovative activities.</p><p style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 0px 30px; color: rgb(68, 68, 68); font-size: 19px; line-height: 25px; font-family: ">“I thought it was fun,” she said. “It was a good thing to come out and be able to (participate).”</p><p style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 0px 30px; color: rgb(68, 68, 68); font-size: 19px; line-height: 25px; font-family: ">Eliah Henderson, 22, also appreciated the message that was conveyed through the “Burritos over Booze” event.</p><p style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 0px 30px; color: rgb(68, 68, 68); font-size: 19px; line-height: 25px; font-family: ">“It’s important to stay in your right mind, not to drink and be safe, as well,” Henderson said.</p><p style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 0px 30px; color: rgb(68, 68, 68); font-size: 19px; line-height: 25px; font-family: ">Quentin Sherman, 21, considered the event educational.</p><p style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 0px 30px; color: rgb(68, 68, 68); font-size: 19px; line-height: 25px; font-family: ">“It showed me what it’s like to be pulled over and tested to see if you’re drunk,” he said.</p><p style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 0px 30px; color: rgb(68, 68, 68); font-size: 19px; line-height: 25px; font-family: ">The free burrito was a plus, he added, as he happily indulged in one.</p><p style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 0px 30px; color: rgb(68, 68, 68); font-size: 19px; line-height: 25px; font-family: ">Olson said he was pleased that the message was received.</p><p style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 0px 30px; color: rgb(68, 68, 68); font-size: 19px; line-height: 25px; font-family: ">“They got the message,” he said of the purpose of the event. “That’s the whole idea is to just spread those seeds of information. We know that there’s a lot of information out there, a lot of things that young people have to deal with and a lot of peer pressure and all those types of things; and if we can keep giving out the information on the health risks of underage drinking and binge drinking, then hopefully through continuing to share this information and through the coalition being in the community, we’ll get some change.”</p><p style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 0px 30px; color: rgb(68, 68, 68); font-size: 19px; line-height: 25px; font-family: ">The coalition meets every third Tuesday of the month at Marshall Public Library from 1-2 p.m. for those interested in joining the group in the fight against alcohol and drug abuse among youth and young adults, ages 18 to 25.</p><p style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 0px 30px; color: rgb(68, 68, 68); font-size: 19px; line-height: 25px; font-family: ">“Our next meeting is Tuesday, Aug. 21,” said Olson.</p><p><br></p><p>Published in Marshall News Messanger on August 15, 2018 by&nbsp;<a href="https://www.marshallnewsmessenger.com/users/profile/ryrichardson" style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); font-family: &quot;PT Serif&quot;, serif; font-size: 14px;">Robin Y. Richardson ryrichardson@marshallnewsmessenger.com</a></p><ul style="box-sizing: border-box; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 10px; padding-left: 0px; list-style: none; margin-left: -5px; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: &quot;PT Serif&quot;, serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: 400; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;">&nbsp;</ul><!--EndFragment--><!--EndFragment--> Wed, 15 Aug 2018 05:00:00 +0000 http://etcada.com/blog/post/secondhand-smoke-poses-greater-risks-for-teens-study Secondhand smoke poses greater risks for teens: Study http://etcada.com/blog/post/secondhand-smoke-poses-greater-risks-for-teens-study <p>More than 1.1 billion adults worldwide smoke cigarettes and, though laws that limit public and workplace smoking are lessening the amount of exposure to the public, an estimated 9.6 million U.S. adolescents are exposed to tobacco smoke, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention.</p><p>Since the 1960s, researchers have been looking at the health effects of secondhand smoking and have linked this exposure with an increased likelihood of getting ear infections, lung infections and even contributing to poor lung development in small children.</p><p>Additional research has demonstrated secondhand smoke exposure in children both increases the likelihood of suffering from asthma and worsens the severity of it in children afflicted by this condition.</p><p>Researchers from the University of Cincinnati wanted to understand the effects of secondhand smoke in otherwise healthy teenagers whose lungs are fully developed and who should be past the stage of frequent colds and ear infections.</p><p>“There was a [lack] of information about how [secondhand smoke] affects adolescents [without asthma], so we decided to look into this specific group of people,” Dr. Ashley Merianos, lead author for the study, told ABC News.</p><p>Merianos and her team reviewed information from 7,300 non-smoking teens ages 12 to 17 without asthma from the 2017 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ report on tobacco and health.</p><p>In the study, “Adolescent Tobacco Smoke Exposure, Respiratory Symptoms, and Emergency Department Use,” published in the journal Pediatrics, they found more than one-third of teens were around others who smoked for at least one hour a day for the past seven days — this included time at home, in a car, at school or outdoors.</p><p>The teens who were exposed to secondhand smoke longer than an hour a day were more likely to report shortness of breath, difficulty exercising compared with peers, wheezing during or after exercise, a dry cough at night, visiting an ER or urgent care in the past 12 months for any reason, missing school due to being sick, and were less likely to report good overall and physical health.</p><p>Of note, since the study is based on the teens’ estimates of smoke exposure, as opposed to objective measures, they could have been exposed for longer periods of time than reported.</p><p>Merianos said that this type of study cannot determine cause and effect, just an association, so more research that “could look into how these relationships are developing over time.”</p><p>Even after the smoking stops, odors and toxic chemicals from tobacco smoke may linger in homes days, months, and even years, according to the California Consortium for Thirdhand Smoke – because of the exposure to smoke components and smoke by-products.</p><p>When asked about research efforts on thirdhand smoke exposure, Merianos said one of his colleagues just completed a study of clinical factors, but the research has not been published yet.</p><p><span open="" style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: ;"><!--StartFragment-->Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.</span><!--EndFragment--></p> Tue, 07 Aug 2018 05:00:00 +0000 http://etcada.com/blog/post/prc4-2018-regional-needs-assessment-available-for-download PRC4 2018 Regional Needs Assessment Available for Download http://etcada.com/blog/post/prc4-2018-regional-needs-assessment-available-for-download <!--StartFragment--><p>The Regional Needs Assessment (RNA) report is created by each Prevention Resource Center in the state of Texas, in conjunction with the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) every year.&nbsp; Data compiled to produce this report is gathered to provide the state, agencies and organizations, and the community at large with a comprehensive view of information about the trends, outcomes, and consequences associated with alcohol, tobacco and other drug use in the region.&nbsp; The methodology for this report was designed to enable PRC’s, DSHS, and community stakeholders to engage in long-term strategic prevention planning based on current and prospective services relative to the needs of the communities in the State.</p><p>This assessment was designed to aid PRC’s, DSHS, and community stakeholders in long-term strategic prevention planning based on most current information relative to the unique needs of the diverse communities in the State of Texas.&nbsp; This document presents a summary of statistics relevant to risk and protective factors associated with drug use, as well as consumption patterns and consequences data, at the same time offers insight related to gaps in services and data availability challenges.</p><p>The&nbsp;<strong><a href="/rna.pdf" target="_blank">2018 Regional Needs Assessment</a></strong>&nbsp;is completed and now available to download.&nbsp; The RNA is focused on adolescent use of alcohol, marijuana, and prescription drugs in our region.&nbsp; Region 4 consists of 23 counties in East Texas.</p><!--EndFragment--> Mon, 23 Jul 2018 05:00:00 +0000 http://etcada.com/blog/post/panola-county-sues-opioid-manufacturers-joining-growing-list-of-east-texas-plaintiffs Panola County sues opioid manufacturers, joining growing list of East Texas plaintiffs http://etcada.com/blog/post/panola-county-sues-opioid-manufacturers-joining-growing-list-of-east-texas-plaintiffs <!--StartFragment--><p>By: Meredith Shamburger - Longview News-Journal&nbsp;</p><p>CARTHAGE — Panola County has joined a growing list of East Texas counties that are suing opioid manufacturers, claiming they misled doctors and created an ongoing public health and safety crisis.</p><p>A federal lawsuit on behalf of the county, filed May 16, says opioid manufacturers “downplayed the serious risk of addiction; promoted and exaggerated the concept of ‘pseudoaddiction’ thereby advocating that the signs of addiction should be treated with more opioids; exaggerated the effectiveness of screening tools in preventing addiction; claimed that opioid dependence and withdrawal are easily managed; denied the risks of higher opioid dosages; and exaggerated the effectiveness of ‘abuse-deterrent’ opioid formulations to prevent abuse and addiction.”&nbsp;</p><p>Panola County Judge LeeAnn Jones said the opioid problem is “bigger than you know.”&nbsp;</p><p>“The DA and sheriff’s office see it,” she said. “And of course, you see tragic stories on Facebook all the time of people who are addicted.”&nbsp;</p><p>Opioids are legally prescribed to reduce pain, with common drugs being hydrocodone (Vicodin), oxycodone (OxyContin) and morphine.&nbsp;</p><p>Panola follows several other area counties that filed suits against opioid manufacturers, including Harrison, Marion, Upshur, Rusk and Smith counties. Many of those other counties’ lawsuits also have been filed in federal court. Texas is part of a 41-state investigation of companies that manufacture or sell opioids. The East Texas Council on Alcohol and Drug Abuse notes Panola County is part of a region that “has astonishingly high numbers for prescription drug use,” and students in the area have the highest reported use rate in Texas in codeine cough syrup and OxyContin, Percodan, Percocet, Oxycodone, Vicodin, Lortab, Lorcet and Hydrocodone.&nbsp;</p><p>Panola County filed suit against Purdue Pharma, Purdue Pharma, The Purdue Frederick Co., Johnson &amp; Johnson, Janseen Pharmaceuticals, Ortho-McNeil-Janssen Pharmaceuticals n/k/a Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Endo Health Solutions and Endo Pharmaceuticals, a subsidiary of Endo Health Solutions. Panola County officials say problems stemming from opioid addiction include lost of productivity, increased social services, increased health insurance costs, an increased criminal justice presence and a strain on judicial resources and substance abuse treatment and rehabilitation.</p><p>Panola County was contacted by Love Law Firm out of Henderson, which made a presentation to the Commissioners Court, Jones said. Love Law Firm is not charging the county for its services; it will collect a percentage of any monies awarded to the county when the lawsuit ends, Jones said.</p><!--EndFragment--> Fri, 08 Jun 2018 05:00:00 +0000 http://etcada.com/blog/post/seniors-more-likely-to-fall-when-taking-opioids-after-hospital-treatment-study Seniors More Likely to Fall When Taking Opioids After Hospital Treatment: Study http://etcada.com/blog/post/seniors-more-likely-to-fall-when-taking-opioids-after-hospital-treatment-study <!--StartFragment--><p>Seniors recovering from trauma after being admitted to hospitals may be more likely to have falls when taking prescribed opioids, according to a new study.&nbsp;</p><p>While opioids are commonly used to manage acute pain, they can have harmful side effects, particularly for seniors. In this study, published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal, those who had filled an opioid prescription within two weeks preceding their injuries were 2.4 times more likely to have suffered a fall.&nbsp;</p><p>"Taking opioids is like drinking alcohol" and there are side effects, according to lead study author Dr. Raoul Daoust. It’s important to remind people to use caution.&nbsp;</p><p>Elderly people who are prescribed opioids should be encouraged to take as few as they need and be careful when moving around at home, added Daoust, who is an emergency medicine researcher and clinician at Sacré-Coeur hospital in Montreal.&nbsp;</p><p>In this study, researchers looked at a decade of hospital records between 2004 and 2014, for almost 68,000 people older than 65 in Quebec, Canada, who were admitted to the hospital after a trauma -- a catch-all term that generally includes falls, car accidents and penetrating injuries.</p><p>Falls were the most common type of trauma in this patient population. The average age of the patients was about 81 years old and the majority, 69 percent, were women.</p><p>Opioids help the brain manage pain, but can lead to drowsiness and dizziness in some people, the authors said. This combination of symptoms, they added, may affect balance and make falls more likely, particularly in older people.</p><p>The authors attempted to rule-out other common causes of falls like alcoholism, weakness, recent cancer diagnosis, and use of other medications that cause abnormal balance.</p><p>While this study cannot clearly state that opioid use causes falls, the authors argue that there is a clear link between the two in people over the age of 65.&nbsp;</p><p>One other concerning finding of this study: Patients with recent opioid use had a slightly increased risk of in-hospital death. While the study did not find a specific reason, the authors suggest that opioid use could be an overall marker of fragility and poor health in an older population.&nbsp;</p><p>Opioids are potent narcotics that have the power to effectively treat severe pain when used appropriately. But doctors and patients alike should remain aware of their side effects and be particularly careful with their use, especially for seniors.&nbsp;</p><p><em>Source</em>: ABC News, Dr. Laura Shopp, April 28, 2018&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="https://abcnews.go.com/Health/opioid-linked-falls-seniors-hospital-treatments-trauma/story?id=54667448">https://abcnews.go.com/Health/opioid-linked-falls-seniors-hospital-treatments-trauma/story?id=54667448</a></p><!--EndFragment--> Thu, 17 May 2018 05:00:00 +0000